Evaluation of influential measures to control the monetary aspects of load haul dump machine-case study

Evaluation of influential measures to control the monetary aspects of load haul dump machine-case study

J. BalaRaju M Govinda Raj  S.N. Murthy Ch 

Dept. Mining Engineering, NITK, Karnataka, India

Corresponding Author Email: 
jakkulabalraj@gmail.com
Page: 
155-161
|
DOI: 
10.18280/mmep.040403
Received: 
|
Accepted: 
|
Published: 
31 December 2017
| Citation

OPEN ACCESS

Abstract: 

Each mining enterprise constantly searching out its each equipment must perform as anticipated. An efficient mode of accomplishment of that is to have a definite life cycle for a device thru an optimized upkeep strategy. Machine failures are the principle reasons for depreciation of production expenses in mechanized mining operations. Cost-effective values of both direct cost and indirect cost are very essential to assess the machine’s lifecycle. Preservation costs against system disasters are handled as direct costs and other charges consisting of profits, wages, stores, electricity and transportation expenses are treated as indirect prices. On this present have a look at both direct and oblique prices associated with system disasters in underground mine are recognized. Cost controlling evaluations of system failures were achieved for both annual operating and capital cost by means of growing a life cycle cost (LCC) model. Further an attempt has been made to perceive the prevalence of system screw ups and viable price-effective measures are advised to govern the failure prevalence.

Keywords: 

Machine Failure, Acquisition Value, Operating Price, Renovation Cost, Disposal or Scrap Price, Lifestyles Cycle Cost

1. Introduction
2. Life Cycle Cost (LCC)
3. Factors of LCC
4. Required Statistics for LCC Analysis
5. LCC Analysis - Case Study
6. Conclusion
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