Representation of Vernacular Architecture and Lessons for Sustainable and Culturally Responsive Environment

Representation of Vernacular Architecture and Lessons for Sustainable and Culturally Responsive Environment

B.A. Kazimee 

School of Architecture & Construction Management, Washington State University, USA

Page: 
337-350
|
DOI: 
https://doi.org/10.2495/DNE-V4-N4-337-350
Received: 
N/A
|
Accepted: 
N/A
|
Published: 
31 December 2009
| Citation

OPEN ACCESS

Abstract: 

This paper identifies principles that will provide important insights and lessons for those who are involved in the development of future sustainable built environments. Two case studies chosen with particular geographical and cultural contexts, one located in the northeastern mountain valleys of Afghanistan and the other located in the central-arid region of Iran, have been used. This paper will demonstrate principles of vernacular architecture as characterized by sustainable affinity between nature and human settlement that are prevalent in these regions. The value of compact townscape, self-help and participatory building approaches, conservation, the use of natural energy systems, and other strategies that will help preserve the ecological integrity of place and at the same time enrich its cultural heritage will be presented.

Keywords: 

community/participation, conservation, cultural heritage, density, regional quality, sustainability/ affordability

  References

[1] frampton, K., Critical Regionalism: Modern Architecture and Cultural Identity in Modern Architecture: A Critical History, Thames and hudson: london, p. 313, 1985.

[2] asquith, l., & Vellinga, m., Vernacular Architecture in the Twenty-First Century: Theory,  Education and Practice, Taylor & francis: london and New york, p. 16, 2006.

[3] asquith, l., & Vellinga, m., Vernacular Architecture in the Twenty-First Century: Theory, Education and Practice, Taylor & francis: london and New york, p. 1, 2006.

[4] Edelberg, l., Nuristani Buildings, Jutland archaeological Society Publications XVIII, 1984.

[5] Edelberg, l., Nuristani Buildings, Jutland archaeological Society Publications XVIII, p. 10, 1984.

[6] Szabo, a. & barfield, T.J., Afghanistan: An Atlas of Indigenous Domestic Architecture,  university of Texas Press: austin and hong Kong, 1991.

[7] Oliver, P., Dwelling: The House Across the World, Phaidon Press: Oxford, uK, p. 11, 1987.

[8] Rabeneck, a., Sheppard, D. & Town, P., The structure of space in family housing: an alternative to present design practice. Progressive Architecture, p. 103, 1974.

[9] Oliver, P., Dwelling: The House across the World, Phaidon Press: Oxford, uK, p. 12, 1987.

[10] Kazimee, b.a., Sustainable reconstruction and planning strategies for afghan cities: conservation in culture and environmental heritage. The Sustainable City IV: Urban Regenerative and Sustainability, eds u. mander, c.a. brebbia & E. Tiezzi, WIT Press: uK, pp. 49–59, 2006.

[11] moughtin, c. & Shirley, P., Urban Design: Green Dimensions, 2nd edn, architectural Press: Oxford, uK, p. 32, 2005.

[12] bartuska, T., Sustainability: the emerging new paradigm for environmental design.  Constructing New Worlds, ACSA Proc. of International Conference, Rio de Janeiro, brazil, p. 47, 1998.