Porous Properties and Surface Chemical Properties of the Modified Biomass Materials

Porous Properties and Surface Chemical Properties of the Modified Biomass Materials

Ling Zhang Xiaoying Zeng  Tiandong Zhang  Weiyao Hu  Rui Gao  JianyunYang  Zhaolin Zhan 

Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, No. 68, Wenchang Road, Kunming 650093, China

R&D Center, China Tobacco Yunnan Industrial Co. Ltd., No. 367, Hongjin Road, Kunming 650231, China

Corresponding Author Email: 
zhang-874005@163. com
Page: 
7-13
|
DOI: 
10.18280/eesrj.030102
Received: 
|
Accepted: 
|
Published: 
31 March 2016
| Citation

OPEN ACCESS

Abstract: 

Porous material was prepared bycarbonization and modification treatmentof the residues extracted from tobacco stems. The preparation process of the adsorption material was optimized by response surface method. The structure and properties of the product were characterizedby scanning electron microscopy, N2 adsorption-desorption, infrared spectroscopy. The results showed that: the excellent produced conditions for the adsorption materials are as follows: the temperature is 707.40 ℃, the ratio is 1:3 and the time is 17.20 min. The surface of material modified by KOH wasat typicalporousstructurewhich mainlybasedona large number of cavities and pores. The material had high specific surface areas and pore volumes. The material surface was a typical porous structure with a moderate pore size and uniform distribution. The pore structure is mainly based on the larger mesoporous structure and a certain microporous structure. Thematerialwith the specific surface areas and pore volumesas high as 1513.27 m2 /gand 0.67cm3/g were obtained. The pore size is concentrated between 6 ~ 15 nm, which belongs to mesoporous materials. The modified material possesses more abundant functional groups, s such as -OH, -CH and other functional groups, so that the material has a certain pro – organic. The material can effectively adsorb the tar, CO and phenol in the cigarette smoke, which decreased by 20.5%, 19.2%, 49.66%, respectively. The preparation method is simple and easy to operate, and the raw materials are easy to get. The materialhas a strong industrialapplication prospect.

Keywords: 

Tobacco stem, Residue, Porous materials, Microstructure, Surface properties

1. Introduction
2. Materials and Methods
3. Results and Discussion
4. Conclusions
Acknowledgement
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